crownedlegend: Queen Elizabeth and Prince Ph…

crownedlegend:

Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip dancing

theroyalhistory: Princess Elizabeth (Queen El…

theroyalhistory:

Princess Elizabeth (Queen Elizabeth II), Princess Margaret, the Duke and Duchess of York (King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother), 1936

Regular

royalwatcher:

“Prince Philip is ‘conscious but very shocked and shaken’ after crashing his Land Rover near the Sandringham Estate. The Queen is by The Duke’s side following the collision which happened when he was pulling out of a driveway onto the A149 in Babingley, Norfolk.”

DM

lilibetss: One of my favorite pictures of the…

lilibetss:

One of my favorite pictures of the Royal Family in Balmoral. The place is huge but they were squeezed in together in the picture lol

royalwatcher: Source: Getty Images 

royalwatcher:

Source: Getty Images 

theroyalhistory: The Countess of Strathmore h…

theroyalhistory:

The Countess of Strathmore holding Princess Elizabeth (Queen Elizabeth II), 1926

sussexcraze: In 1953, The Queen and The Duke …

sussexcraze:

In 1953, The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh greet the public on the balcony of the Grand Pacific Hotel in Suva, Fiji. 

65 years later, their grandson The Duke of Sussex, together with his wife, The Duchess of Sussex, greet the members of the public on the same balcony. 

theroyalhistory: Princess Elizabeth (Queen El…

theroyalhistory:

Princess Elizabeth (Queen Elizabeth II), 1938

royal-roaster: Four generations of royal br…

royal-roaster:

Four generations of royal brides and bridesmaids (GB)

Regular

deadpresidents:

Barack had always felt a special fondness for Queen Elizabeth, saying that she reminded him of his no-nonsense grandmother, Toot. I personally was awed by her efficiency, a skill clearly forged by necessity over a lifetime in the public eye. One day a few years earlier, Barack and I had stood, hosting a receiving line together with her and Prince Philip. I’d watched, bemused, as the Queen managed to whisk people speedily past with economic, friendly hellos that left no room for follow-up conversation, while Barack projected an amiable looseness, almost inviting chitchat and then ponderously answering people’s questions, thereby messing up the flow of the line. All these years after meeting the guy, I was still trying to get him to hurry up.

One afternoon in April 2016, the two of us took a helicopter from the American ambassador’s residence in London to Windsor Castle in the countryside west of the city. Our advance team instructed us that the Queen and Prince Philip were planning to meet us when we landed and then personally drive us back to the castle for lunch. As was always the case, we were briefed on the protocol ahead of time. We’d greet the royals formally before getting into their vehicle to make the short drive. I’d sit in the front next to ninety-four-year-old Prince Philip, who would drive, and Barack would sit next to the Queen in the backseat.

It would be the first time in more than eight years that the two of us had been driven by anyone other than a Secret Service agent, or ridden in a car together without agents. This seemed to matter to our security teams, the same way the protocol mattered to the advance teams, who fretted endlessly over our movements and interactions, making sure that every last little thing looked right and went smoothly.

After we’d touched down in a field on the palace grounds and said our hellos, however, the Queen abruptly threw a wrench into everything by gesturing for me to join her in the backseat of the Range Rover. I froze, trying to remember if anyone had prepped me for this scenario, whether it was more polite to go along with it or to insist that Barack take his proper seat by her side.

The Queen immediately picked up on my hesitation. And was having none of it.

“Did they give you some rule about this?” she said, dismissing all the fuss with a wave of her hand. “That’s rubbish. Sit wherever you want.”

– Michelle Obama, Becoming (BOOK | KINDLE), available Tuesday.